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223 items found for ""

  • Banjo - Gretsch G9400 Broadkaster Deluxe | Bluegrassbasics

    < Back Banjo - Gretsch G9400 Broadkaster Deluxe This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. Want to view and manage all your collections? Click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. Here, you can make changes to your content, add new fields, create dynamic pages and more. You can create as many collections as you need. Your collection is already set up for you with fields and content. Add your own, or import content from a CSV file. Add fields for any type of content you want to display, such as rich text, images, videos and more. You can also collect and store information from your site visitors using input elements like custom forms and fields. Be sure to click Sync after making changes in a collection, so visitors can see your newest content on your live site. Preview your site to check that all your elements are displaying content from the right collection fields. Previous Next

  • Banjolele/Uke | Bluegrassbasics

    < Back Banjolele/Uke Ukuleles are not part of the typical bluegrass ensemble. Due to a renewed popularity in the United States, they are becoming more common at bluegrass jams. A major hurdle for ukes is the ability to be heard in such a large group. The combination of the small size and nylon strings makes projecting the sound quite a challenge. One solution to this is playing a banjolele. It is the same size and tuning as a ukulele but being built on a banjo body means that it is typically louder and projects better than a traditional ukulele. If a banjolele isn't an option, then using larger ukulele sizes like tenor- or concert-sized ukuleles could be helpful. Left - Stella Banjolele - This banjolele was built in the heyday of banjo ukes in the 1920s. It has been upgraded with Ratio Tune-A-Lele Ukulele Tuners . The original "friction" tuners did not hold the tension of the strings very well. These upgraded tuners are "geared" but have a very small footprint. Right - Harmony Baritone Ukulele - Baritone ukuleles are tuned like the top 4 strings of a guitar - DGBE. This one has been upgraded with Grover geared ukulele tuners . Previous Next

  • Marketing Associate

    < Back Marketing Associate Apply Now San Francisco, CA, USA Job Type Part Time About the Role This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. Want to view and manage all your collections? Click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. Here, you can make changes to your content, add new fields, create dynamic pages and more. Your collection is already set up for you with fields and content. Add your own content or import it from a CSV file. Add fields for any type of content you want to display, such as rich text, images, and videos. Be sure to click Sync after making changes in a collection, so visitors can see your newest content on your live site. Requirements This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. To manage all your collections, click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. To manage all your collections, click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. To manage all your collections, click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. To manage all your collections, click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. About the Company This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. Want to view and manage all your collections? Click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. Here, you can make changes to your content, add new fields, create dynamic pages and more. You can create as many collections as you need. Your collection is already set up for you with fields and content. Add your own, or import content from a CSV file. Add fields for any type of content you want to display, such as rich text, images, videos and more. You can also collect and store information from your site visitors using input elements like custom forms and fields. Be sure to click Sync after making changes in a collection, so visitors can see your newest content on your live site. Preview your site to check that all your elements are displaying content from the right collection fields. Apply Now

  • Guitar | Bluegrassbasics

    < Back Guitar ​In bluegrass music, the guitar plays an integral part of the ensemble as the basis of rhythm and chord-structure for the songs. That's one reason why many bluegrass jams tend to follow the guitarist. As bluegrass music has formed over the years, the guitar has taken on more of a role as a melody instrument as well. Due to these roles in the ensemble, bluegrass guitarists seek guitars that are loud and have a lot of bass response - for the rhythm guitar - as well as treble presence for solos to cut through the mix of other instruments. ​ Far Left - The Martin D-18 is an iconic bluegrass guitar. This standard model of the Martin lineup features a solid spruce top, solid mahogany back and sides, and ebony fingerboard and bridge. It is made in Martin's "dreadnought" size and has forward-shifted scalloped bracing to give it a robust sound. This guitar does not have a ton of complexity to it, so it is a good choice for the bluegrass ensemble. 2nd from Left - The Recording King RD-328 is modeled somewhat after the Martin HD-28 . It pairs a solid Adirondack spruce top with solid East Indian rosewood back and sides. The Adirondack spruce is a very stiff wood that can be played hard and responds well in a bluegrass setting. The rosewood back and sides are a very "reflective" wood that add a lot of complexity to the sound of the guitar. This is another great option for a bluegrass ensemble and is another color on your sound palette. Middle - Pono DS-20 - This is a variation on the typical square-shouldered dreadnoughts listed above. Whereas those guitars have the body meeting the neck at the 14th fret, this style moves the bridge back into a more centered position in the lower bout of the guitar. This gives it a loud, full sound but also makes the neck of the guitar shorter - meeting the body at the 12th fret. This guitar can be a good choice for musicians who want the large body size, but have difficulty reaching the neck of a 14-fret dreadnought. While it isn't as ubiquitous as the D-18 and D-28, there is some tradition of 12-fret dreadnoughts being played in bluegrass music with Norman Blake being a notable example. 2nd from Right - The Recording King ROS-11 is modeled after the Martin 000-18 and while it isn't a "typical" bluegrass guitar can be a good option for certain guitarists. It still has a relatively large body shape but the more narrow waist can make it more comfortable to play, especially for musicians with shoulder issues. It has a very balanced tone and is more commonly seen in Old Time ensembles. Far Right - Epiphone Olympic - Definitely not a typical bluegrass guitar, an archtop guitar can be a good choice for a bluegrass jam that already has a number of guitarists. The arched top and f-holes give it a sound that is punchy and occupies a different aural space than the dreadnought guitar does. That's one reason the Epiphone Olympic - made famous by Dave Rawlings - paired so well with Gillian Welch's Gibson J-50. *It is important to note that Epiphone released a modern version of the Olympic , which lacks some of the definition of its namesake. Previous Next

  • Toy Heart | Bluegrassbasics

    Nashville - Toy Heart.pdf

  • How Mountain Girls Can Love | Bluegrassbasics

    Concert Pitch - How Mountain Girls Can Love.pdf Nashville - How Mountain Girls Can Love.pdf

  • Content Manager

    < Back Content Manager Apply Now San Francisco, CA, USA Job Type Full Time About the Role This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. Want to view and manage all your collections? Click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. Here, you can make changes to your content, add new fields, create dynamic pages and more. Your collection is already set up for you with fields and content. Add your own content or import it from a CSV file. Add fields for any type of content you want to display, such as rich text, images, and videos. Be sure to click Sync after making changes in a collection, so visitors can see your newest content on your live site. Requirements I don't understand this at all. About the Company This is placeholder text. To change this content, double-click on the element and click Change Content. Want to view and manage all your collections? Click on the Content Manager button in the Add panel on the left. Here, you can make changes to your content, add new fields, create dynamic pages and more. You can create as many collections as you need. Your collection is already set up for you with fields and content. Add your own, or import content from a CSV file. Add fields for any type of content you want to display, such as rich text, images, videos and more. You can also collect and store information from your site visitors using input elements like custom forms and fields. Be sure to click Sync after making changes in a collection, so visitors can see your newest content on your live site. Preview your site to check that all your elements are displaying content from the right collection fields. Apply Now HELP!!! I'M SO FRUSTRATED!

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